Tag Archives: kale

Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free in The Good Life, Chelsea

The Good Life Blackboard

When Beyonce and Jay Z announced that they were going vegan for a while, it seemed like healthy, conscious food had turned a corner. Eating chia seeds and talking about being respectful to the planet was no longer the domain of tie-dyes and guitar-playing. Instead, vegan and macrobiotic and the like was on the mainstream menu – with fantastic cafes and restaurants springing up and mainstream eateries widening up their offerings.

One great place is The Good Life Eatery on Sloane Street. Step in and it’s immediately clear that you’re going to feel superhealthy from whatever you eat. I went at breakfast time and had the Acai Bowl – gluten-free granola, raw Brazilian acai blended with Brazil nuts, kiwi fruit and bananas, complete with bee pollen and coconut sprinkled over the top. It was completely delicious. An earthy tang from the acai, along with sweetness from the granola, fruit and sprinkles. And every bite enriched with nutrients.

Acai-Bowl-Good-Life

And I had my first ever (first of many) cold-pressed juice. Cold-pressing is all about maximising the nutrients. Juicing normally involves fast-spinning blades that generate heat which kill the precious enzymes. But with the pressing action of cold-press, this doesn’t happen. I had the Dr Green Love and it was a whole new juicing experience. Serious full-on flavours hit you immediately. And the combination of spinach, kale, apple and coconut was a great balance of veggie-tastes with sweet fruits. I’ve been a cold-pressed convert ever since…

The Good Life Eatery is at 59 Sloane Avenue, London SW3 3DH. And you can also get a home-delivery through Deliveroo.

Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free Kale Salad with Toasted Seeds

Nourish Kale

In my role at the publishers DBP, I have been working on a book that has just come out – Nourish: The Cancer Care Cookbook. Written by the team at Penny Brohn Cancer Centre and nutritionist Christine Bailey, it shows you how to create delicious meals, snacks and drinks that are packed with nutrients to support your body if you have cancer.

The introduction to the book explains the role of nutrition in protecting against cancer, helping to alleviate some of the symptoms, and forming a crucial part of any cancer treatment programme. And then there are recipes for shakes, juices, smoothies and breakfasts, soups and light meals, main meals, desserts and baked treats. There are also recipes that are designed specifically to help with the common side effects of treatment. The recipes are easy and quick to prepare, and highly nutritious.

We tried this simple kale salad. I wanted to try it because I’m always looking for ways to make kale taste good. I find it unappetising and bitter, but I know that it’s supergood for you! (Kale is packed with flavonoids – antioxidants that help lower inflammation and protect against cell damage. This cruciferous super-food is also rich in glucosinolates, which can play a primary role in protection against many forms of cancer.) The combination of the tamari-toasted seeds with the avocado/lemon dressing sounded good. And it really was! I served this with steamed fish and it was a great success.  (And by the way, it’s worth making up a batch of the toasted seeds and keeping them for a snack.)

gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free

Serves 4
Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 3 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 250g/9oz kale, large stems discarded, leaves roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp garlic salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast flakes (optional)
  • 1 ripe avocado, pitted and peeled
  • 3 tbsp lemon juice
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp olive oil or flaxseed oil
  • 2 tsp tamari
  • 200g/7oz/1⅓ cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 handful of alfalfa sprouts

Toasted seeds and nuts:

  • 2 tbsp pine nuts
  • 6 tbsp mixed seeds, such as sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and hemp seeds
  • 2 tbsp tamari
  1. To make the toasted seeds and nuts, put them in a dry frying pan over medium heat and lightly toast for 1 minute, stirring. As they begin to colour, pour over the tamari and stir to combine. Stir for 1–2 minutes until crisp. Leave to cool.
  2. Put the kale into a large bowl and sprinkle over the garlic salt and yeast flakes, if using. Massage with your hands to allow the kale to soften. Put the avocado, lemon juice, cumin, oil and tamari into a blender or food processor and process until smooth. Mix into the kale so that it is thoroughly coated. Stir in the tomatoes and sprinkle over the alfalfa sprouts and toasted seeds and nuts, then serve. (Store in the fridge for up to 2 days.)

Nutritional Information per serving
Protein 9.8g, Carbohydrates 7.8g of which sugars 4.8g, Fat 24.3g of which saturates 3.1g, Kcals 289

Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free Kale Salad with Toasted Seeds

Nourish Kale

In my role at the publishers DBP, I have been working on a book that has just come out – Nourish: The Cancer Care Cookbook. Written by the team at Penny Brohn Cancer Centre and nutritionist Christine Bailey, it shows you how to create delicious meals, snacks and drinks that are packed with nutrients to support your body if you have cancer.

The introduction to the book explains the role of nutrition in protecting against cancer, helping to alleviate some of the symptoms, and forming a crucial part of any cancer treatment programme. And then there are recipes for shakes, juices, smoothies and breakfasts, soups and light meals, main meals, desserts and baked treats. There are also recipes that are designed specifically to help with the common side effects of treatment. The recipes are easy and quick to prepare, and highly nutritious.

We tried this simple kale salad. I wanted to try it because I’m always looking for ways to make kale taste good. I find it unappetising and bitter, but I know that it’s supergood for you! (Kale is packed with flavonoids – antioxidants that help lower inflammation and protect against cell damage. This cruciferous super-food is also rich in glucosinolates, which can play a primary role in protection against many forms of cancer.) The combination of the tamari-toasted seeds with the avocado/lemon dressing sounded good. And it really was! I served this with steamed fish and it was a great success.  (And by the way, it’s worth making up a batch of the toasted seeds and keeping them for a snack.)

gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free

Serves 4
Preparation time 10 minutes
Cooking time 3 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 250g/9oz kale, large stems discarded, leaves roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp garlic salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast flakes (optional)
  • 1 ripe avocado, pitted and peeled
  • 3 tbsp lemon juice
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp olive oil or flaxseed oil
  • 2 tsp tamari
  • 200g/7oz/1⅓ cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 handful of alfalfa sprouts

Toasted seeds and nuts:

  • 2 tbsp pine nuts
  • 6 tbsp mixed seeds, such as sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and hemp seeds
  • 2 tbsp tamari
  1. To make the toasted seeds and nuts, put them in a dry frying pan over medium heat and lightly toast for 1 minute, stirring. As they begin to colour, pour over the tamari and stir to combine. Stir for 1–2 minutes until crisp. Leave to cool.
  2. Put the kale into a large bowl and sprinkle over the garlic salt and yeast flakes, if using. Massage with your hands to allow the kale to soften. Put the avocado, lemon juice, cumin, oil and tamari into a blender or food processor and process until smooth. Mix into the kale so that it is thoroughly coated. Stir in the tomatoes and sprinkle over the alfalfa sprouts and toasted seeds and nuts, then serve. (Store in the fridge for up to 2 days.)

Nutritional Information per serving
Protein 9.8g, Carbohydrates 7.8g of which sugars 4.8g, Fat 24.3g of which saturates 3.1g, Kcals 289

Arise & Shine Alkalizing Vegetable Mineral Broth

Onto week 2 of the 4-week Cleanse 28 from Arise & Shine – the Gentle Phase… Week 1 – the Mild Phase – has been easier than I anticipated (although I’m conscious that it’s referred to as Baby steps by the company!) I started getting some cleansing reactions on day 4, but they have been mild – just some slight dizziness and nausea. I’ve also been waking early and finding it hard to go back to sleep again (so I am getting tired) which feels like it’s due to feeling hungry at that time of the early morning. And I’ve been experiencing some emotional cleansing, too – with some outburst of tears! But, apart from that, so far, so good. I’ve lost over 3kg in weight, my skin is looking clearer and I feel more vibrant and clearer-headed.

The hunger aspect of this detox is proving to be fascinating. Generally I eat heartily – not masses, but certainly full plates of food. I’ve never been one of those people who has gone on starvation-style diets to lose weight, and I don’t usually skip meals as I feel too hungry if I do. I normally eat healthily, but I don’t pay particular attention to calories. I won’t eat loads of sweet food and I won’t eat junk food – because they’re unhealthy – but I don’t particularly restrict the amount I eat.

Just before I started this detox I decided that I wasn’t going to let fear of hunger become an issue during the program. I decided that I was simply going to see how I get on. And so far it feels like it’s not an issue. Certainly I don’t feel full at the end of a meal in the way I normally do, and certainly I am feeling hungry throughout the day and night. But I’m eating large platefuls of veggies and fruit and it’s proving to be enough – and I’m finding that I’m not dwelling on it as a problem. In fact, I’m even finding it ok to make Zoe’s meals and sit happily with her as she eats them. Phew!

During the week I’ve had fresh juices and some soaked nuts in the mornings and often salads at lunch (as this is much easier at work.) In the evenings I’ve either had steamed veggies (wow, steamed broccoli tastes good!) or quinoa with different types of veggies, either steamed or raw. I’ve also been making the Alkalizing Vegetable Mineral Broth from the Arise & Shine Sample Menus in the Program Guide, and this tastes really good.

Arise & Shine Alkalizing Vegetable Mineral Broth (made with organic ingredients) – often also known as Potassium Broth

The recipe below is for a simple version. You can spice it up with a dash, or more, of cayenne pepper or raw apple cider vinegar. Fresh or dried herbs such as parsley, oregano or thyme, or any salt-free, msg-free herbal seasoning blend can be added for extra flavour. And truly, any organically-grown vegetable can be added to the broth.

Ingredients:

  • 3–4 unpeeled potatoes of any variety, diced
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 3–4 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 1–2 carrots, thinly sliced
  • 1 large handful of greens, such as kale or chard (I can’t get either at the moment, so I’ve been using cabbage)
  • 1 sweet potato or yam, diced (optional)
  1. Put all the ingredients in a very large, heavy-based saucepan. Pour in 3.4 litres/3 quarts/generous 13½ cups bottled or distilled water. Cover with a lid and bring to the boil over a medium heat. Turn the heat down to gentle and leave to simmer for 20 minutes.
  2. Strain all the liquid through a sieve, discard the veggies and drink the broth either warm or cold.

Asian-Style Kale


The truth is that I don’t like kale normally. Try as I might, it tastes bitter and unappealing to me. But I know it’s packed with nutrients and fantastically good for you. And it’s wonderfully cheap. So I’ve been experimenting with different flavours to add to it and I think I’ve come up with a winning formula! Bursting with fresh, fiery tastes, this Asian-style version can be served with rice for a light lunch or as a side dish with, say, steamed fish and rice. Enjoy!

gluten-free, dairy-free, yeast-free, egg-free, nut-free, citrus-free

Serves 1 as a main course or 2 as a side dish     Preparation time 5 minutes      Cooking time 5 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 lemongrass stalk, finely sliced
  • 1cm/½in piece of root ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • ½ red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 200g/7oz kale, chopped
  • 1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp agave syrup
  • 1–2 tbsp tamari soy sauce
  1. Heat both of the oils in a wok or large frying pan over a high heat. Add the lemongrass, ginger, chilli and then the garlic and stir-fry for 1 minute, then add the kale and stir-fry for about 2 minutes until the kale is starting to look cooked.
  2. Mix together the rice wine vinegar, agarve syrup and 1 tablespoon of the tamari and pour into the pan. Cook, stirring, for another 1–2 minutes until all of the kale is cooked but remains quite crunchy. Check the seasoning and add the other tablespoon of tamari if you like. Serve hot.